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  • Natural Plant Dyes

    Dyes from Plants

    Natural plant dyes are colorants derived from plant sources that have been used for thousands of years to dye fabrics, yarns, and other materials. These dyes are not only eco-friendly and sustainable but also have unique colours that are difficult to obtain or sometimes just not possible from synthetic dyes.

    Natural Dyes and FelinFach

    We make extensive use of natural dyes in our hand dyed yarn and scarves. Our yarn is dyed in small batches in Pembrokeshire, Wales and with natural dyes only. We also offer Craft Courses and Workshops in Pembrokeshire on natural dyeing wool and other fabrics with natural dyes only.

    Yarn hand dyed with natural plant dyes

    History of Natural Plant Dyes

    The use of natural plant dyes can be from ancient times when people used to extract dyes from plants, animals, and minerals. In ancient Egypt, mummies have been found with clothing that was dyed with natural plant dyes. Similarly, in ancient India, the art of dyeing fabrics with natural plant dyes was advanced, and it continues to this day. In Europe, the use of natural plant dyes was widespread in the medieval period and was a significant industry. However, with the discovery of synthetic dyes in the 19th century, the use of natural plant dyes declined rapidly.  

    Types of Natural Plant Dyes

    There are numerous plants that can be used to obtain natural plant dyes, and each plant produces a unique colour. Some of the most used plants for natural plant dyes are:

    1. Indigo - Indigo is a plant that produces a deep blue colour. It is one of the oldest dyes used by humans and has been used in various parts of the world for centuries. Indigo is extracted from the leaves of the plant and requires a specific fermentation process to produce the dye.
    2. Madder - Madder is a plant that produces a red colour. It has been used for dyeing fabrics for over 3,000 years and was one of the most important dyes in ancient Rome. The dye is extracted from the roots of the plant.
    3. Weld - Weld is a plant that produces a bright yellow colour. It was widely used in Europe in the Middle Ages and was one of the most important dyes to produce yellow and green colours. The dye is extracted from the leaves and stems of the plant.
    4. Logwood - Logwood is a tree that produces a range of colours from deep purples to pale pinks. It was widely used in the 19th century to dye fabrics and is still used today. The dye is extracted from the heartwood of the tree.
    5. Turmeric - Turmeric is a spice that produces a bright yellow colour. It has been used for centuries in India to dye fabrics and is also used in cooking. The dye is extracted from the root of the plant.

    Hand Dyed Yarns with Natural Dyes at FelinFach

    All yarn at FelinFach is hand dyed yarn, dyed in small batches in Pembrokeshire, Wales and with natural dyes only. 

     

    Natural Plant Dyes Natural Plant Dyes - Hand dyed yarn Natural Plant Dyes - Hand dyed scarves Natural Plant Dyes UK Natural Plant Dyes - Hand dyed yarn UK Natural Plant Dyes - Cellulose fibres, cotton, hemp, linen Natural Plant Dyes - Hand dyed yarn, UK Natural Plant Dyes - Hand Dyed Yarn

    hand dyed yarn with natural plant dyes

    Benefits of Natural Plant Dyes

    Using natural plant dyes has numerous benefits compared to synthetic dyes. Here are some of the key advantages:

    1. Eco-Friendly: Natural plant dyes are derived from renewable plant materials, making them a sustainable and environmentally friendly choice. They do not contain harmful chemicals, heavy metals, or other toxic substances that are often found in synthetic dyes, which can have negative impacts on human health and the environment. Additionally, natural plant dyes are biodegradable and do not contribute to pollution or environmental degradation.
    2. Healthier Option: Synthetic dyes have been associated with various health issues, such as skin allergies, respiratory problems, and even cancer, due to the toxic chemicals they contain. In contrast, natural plant dyes are considered safe and non-toxic, making them a healthier option for dyeing textiles, especially those that come in close contact with the skin, such as clothing, bed linens, and baby products.
    3. Unique Colours: Natural plant dyes offer a wide range of unique colours that cannot be replicated by synthetic dyes. The colours obtained from natural plant materials are often subtle, complex, and have a natural beauty and depth that cannot be achieved with synthetic dyes. Additionally, natural plant dyes can produce colour variations depending on factors such as the type of plant material used, the time of year the plant was harvested, and the pH of the dye bath, resulting in truly one-of-a-kind hues.
    4. Cultural Heritage: Using natural plant dyes is a way to preserve and promote traditional dyeing techniques and cultural heritage. Many indigenous communities around the world

    Natural Plant Dyes Today

    Today, the revival of natural dyes can be seen in various applications, including fashion, textiles, home goods, art, and crafts. Many artisans, designers, and brands are incorporating natural dyes into their products, creating a niche market for sustainable and authentic goods. Consumers are also increasingly seeking out products made with natural dyes as a way to support eco-friendly practices and reconnect with traditional and cultural heritage.

    Natural Plant Dye List

    What Plants make Natural Dyes

    The following dye from plants list does include Cochineal which is derived from an insect as opposed to a plant.

    1. Indigo - Derived from the leaves of the indigo plant, indigo produces a rich blue color that has been used for centuries in textiles and clothing.
    2. Turmeric - A vibrant yellow dye made from the root of the turmeric plant. It is commonly used in cooking as well as for dyeing textiles.
    3. Henna - Obtained from the leaves of the henna plant, henna dye creates a reddish-brown color and is used to create intricate patterns on the skin in various cultures.
    4. Madder root - Known for its red hues, madder root dye is made from the roots of the madder plant and has been used for centuries to create shades of red, pink, and orange.
    5. Weld - Weld is a plant that produces a yellow dye and has been used since ancient times for coloring textiles, paper, and even food.
    6. Cutch - Derived from the heartwood of the acacia tree, cutch produces a range of brown shades and has been used in dyeing for its natural tannins.
    7. Logwood - Obtained from the heartwood of the logwood tree, logwood dye creates shades of purple, gray, and black, and has been used historically for dyeing textiles.
    8. Cochineal - Made from crushed insects found on cactus plants, cochineal produces a vibrant red color and has been used as a natural dye for centuries.
    9. Fustic - Derived from the wood of the fustic tree, fustic produces a yellow dye that has been used traditionally in dyeing textiles and paper.
    10. Osage orange - Obtained from the inner bark of the osage orange tree, this plant dye produces a bright yellow color and has been used by Native Americans for centuries.
    11. Walnut - Walnut husks can be used to create a range of brown shades, from light tan to deep brown, and have been used for dyeing textiles and wood.
    12. Chamomile - Chamomile flowers can be used to create a soft yellow dye and have been used for coloring textiles and as a natural remedy for various ailments.
    13. Coreopsis - Coreopsis flowers produce a vibrant yellow and orange dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and paper.
    14. Bloodroot - Bloodroot, a flowering plant native to North America, produces a deep orange-red dye that has been used by indigenous peoples for coloring textiles and body paint.
    15. Black walnut - The outer husks of black walnuts can be used to create a dark brown dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and as a natural wood stain.
    16. Pokeweed - Pokeweed berries can be used to create a range of pink, purple, and red dyes, and have been used for coloring textiles, paper, and even food.
    17. Marigold - Marigold flowers can be used to create a range of yellow and orange dyes and have been used for dyeing textiles and as a natural insect repellent.
    18. Stinging nettle - Stinging nettle leaves produce a green dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and as a medicinal herb.
    19. Red cabbage - Red cabbage leaves can be used to create a range of blue and purple dyes and have been used for coloring textiles and food.
    20. Avocado pits - Avocado pits can be used to create a soft pink dye and have been used for dyeing textiles and paper.

     

     

     

     

    About FelinFach

    Welsh Blankets - Hand woven in in Wales in limited numbers Wool Throws - Hand woven in Wales Chandlery - Handmade Candles, Reed diffusers, tealights and wax melts - hand poured in Wales  Craft Courses - Natural Dyeing Gift Cards - By Post or by Email

     

    Located in Pembrokeshire Wales, our ethos is defined in the three words...

    NATURAL TRADITIONAL HANDMADE.

    We are a proud supporter of the Campaign for Wool, All Things Wales, Global Welsh and Red Dragon America.

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    Last update 24th April 2023

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