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  • Natural Plant Dyes for Wool

    Natural Plant Dyes for Wool

    Natural plant dyes have been used for thousands of years to dye wool, yarns, and other materials. These dyes are eco-friendly and sustainable but also have unique colours that are difficult to obtain or sometimes just not possible from synthetic dyes.

    Natural Dyes and FelinFach

    We make extensive use of natural plant dyes in our hand dyed yarn. Our yarn is dyed in small batches in Pembrokeshire, Wales and with natural dyes only. We also offer Craft Courses and Workshops in Pembrokeshire on natural dyeing wool and other fabrics with natural dyes only.

    Natural plant dyes for wool. Hand dyed yarn, dyed with natural dyes. Indie yarn dyer
    Hand dyed yarn using natural plant dyes for wool, available in our online shop, click here...

     

    Hand Dyed Yarns with Natural Dyes at FelinFach

    All yarn at FelinFach is hand dyed yarn, dyed in small batches in Pembrokeshire, Wales and dyed only with natural plant dyes for wool - there really are no exceptions to this! 

     

    Benefits of Natural Plant Dyes

    Using natural plant dyes for wool has numerous benefits compared to synthetic dyes. Here are some of the key advantages in our experience:

    1. Eco-Friendly: Natural plant dyes for wool are derived from renewable plant materials, making them a sustainable and environmentally friendly choice. They do not contain harmful chemicals, heavy metals, or other toxic substances that are often found in synthetic dyes, which can have negative impacts on human health and the environment. Additionally, natural plant dyes are biodegradable and do not contribute to pollution.
    2. Unique Colours: Natural plant dye for wool offer a wide range of unique colours that simply cannot be replicated by synthetic dyes. The colours obtained from natural plant materials are often subtle, complex, and have a natural beauty and depth that cannot be achieved with synthetic dyes. Additionally, natural plant dyes can produce colour variations depending on factors such as the type of plant material used, the time of year the plant was harvested, and the pH of the dye bath, resulting in truly one-of-a-kind hues. Part of the beauty of a hand made product.
    3. Cultural Heritage: Using natural plant dyes is a way to preserve and promote traditional dyeing techniques and cultural heritage. Many indigenous communities around the world
    Natural Plant Dyes for wool Natural Plant Dyes for wool - Hand dyed yarn   Natural Plant Dyes for wool - Hand dyed yarn UK Natural Plant Dyes for wool - Cellulose fibres, cotton, hemp, linen Natural Plant Dyes for wool - Hand dyed yarn, UK Natural Plant Dyes for wool - Hand Dyed Yarn

     

    Natural Plant Dyes for Wool. Experienced Natural Dye Tutor

     

    Natural Plant Dyes for Wool List

    20 Plant Dyes for Wool

    The following dye from plants list does include Cochineal which is derived from an insect as opposed to a plant. However, as it is dye we use often and is such a good natural dye for wool, it is included here.

    1. Cochineal
      Made from crushed insects found on cactus plants, cochineal produces a vibrant red colour and has been used as a natural dye for centuries.
    2. Indigo
      The classic blue natural dye colour. Derived from the leaves of the indigo plant, indigo produces a rich blue colour that has been used for centuries in textiles and clothing.
    3. Turmeric
      A vibrant yellow dye made from the root of the turmeric plant. It is commonly used in cooking as well as for dyeing textiles.
    4. Henna
      Obtained from the leaves of the henna plant, henna dye creates a reddish-brown colour and is used to create intricate patterns on the skin in various cultures.
    5. Madder root
      Known for its red hues, madder root dye is made from the roots of the madder plant and has been used for centuries to create shades of red, pink, and orange.
    6. Weld
      Weld is a plant that produces a yellow dye and has been used since ancient times for colouring textiles, paper, and even food.
    7. Cutch
      Derived from the heartwood of the acacia tree, cutch produces a range of brown shades and has been used in dyeing for its natural tannins.
    8. Logwood
      Obtained from the heartwood of the logwood tree, logwood dye creates shades of purple, gray, and black, and has been used historically for dyeing textiles.
    9. Fusti
      Derived from the wood of the fustic tree, fustic produces a yellow dye that has been used traditionally in dyeing textiles and paper.
    10. Osage orange
      Obtained from the inner bark of the osage orange tree, this plant dye produces a bright yellow colour and has been used by Native Americans for centuries.
    11. Walnut
      Walnut husks can be used to create a range of brown shades, from light tan to deep brown, and have been used for dyeing textiles and wood.
    12. Chamomile
      Chamomile flowers can be used to create a soft yellow dye and have been used for colouring textiles and as a natural remedy for various ailments.
    13. Coreopsis
      Coreopsis flowers produce a vibrant yellow and orange dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and paper.
    14. Bloodroot
      Bloodroot, a flowering plant native to North America, produces a deep orange-red dye that has been used by indigenous peoples for coloring textiles and body paint.
    15. Black walnut
      The outer husks of black walnuts can be used to create a dark brown dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and as a natural wood stain.
    16. Pokeweed
      Pokeweed berries can be used to create a range of pink, purple, and red dyes, and have been used for colouring textiles, paper, and even food.
    17. Marigold
      Marigold flowers can be used to create a range of yellow and orange dyes and have been used for dyeing textiles and as a natural insect repellent.
    18. Stinging nettle
      Stinging nettle leaves produce a green dye that has been used for dyeing textiles and as a medicinal herb.
    19. Red cabbage
      Red cabbage leaves can be used to create a range of blue and purple dyes and have been used for coloring textiles and food.
    20. Avocado seeds
      Avocado seeds can be used to create a soft pink dye and have been used for dyeing textiles and paper.

       

      About FelinFach

      Welsh Blankets - Traditional Caernarfon poercullis patterns, contemporary colourspatterns Wool Throws - Hand woven in Wales Chandlery - Hand Poured Candles, Reed diffusers and wax melts - handmade in Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK. Hand dyed yarn, dyed only with natural dyes Craft Courses - Natural Dyeing Gift Cards - By Post or by Email 

       

      Located in Pembrokeshire Wales, our ethos is defined in the three words...

      NATURAL TRADITIONAL HANDMADE.

      We are a proud supporter of Americymru, the Campaign for WoolGlobal Welsh and Red Dragon America.

       

      Last updated 16th May 2024

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